Gloucester Education Foundation’s Annual Arts Festival on display at Sawyer Free Library – come see the community’s young artists’ talent and creativity!

The Sawyer Free Library has partnered with the Gloucester Education Foundation for the Gloucester Public School Arts Festival 2021 which showcases the artwork of local students from kindergarten through high school.

The community’s young artists’ talent and creativity is front and center for all to enjoy at the Library located at 2 Dale Avenue in Gloucester now through June 5, 2021.

Gloucester Education Foundation’s Annual Arts Festival has kicked off in the Library’s Matz Gallery with a display of works by Gloucester High School seniors and Honors Art students, Advanced classes in Sculpture and Clay Work, and Advanced Photography.

Photo by Kyle Clifford, GHS Senior on display in Matz Gallery at Sawyer Free Library

Then, Wednesday, June 2 – Saturday, June 5, 2021, the community is invited to enjoy a special video compilation produced by the Gloucester Education featuring artwork by students of all ages, kindergarten through high school.

The video, which local filmmaker Stephen Brock generously produced, will be shown Library’s big screen on the first floor as well as in the Children’s room through the day during regular Library hours. The video will also be available to view on GEF’s website, thinkthebest.org beginning on June 6th.

Hearts created by students at Beeman Elementary School

For more information about the Gloucester Education Foundation Art’s Festival, visit thinkthebest.org and for information on the Library, go to sawyerfreelibrary.org.

Slice of Cake by GHS Senior, Aryana Moreno on display at Matz Gallery at Sawyer Free Library

Register Now! The GMGI Science Hour on 5/13

This month’s GMGI Science Hour (our final talk before a brief summer hiatus!) features Dr. Nadia Rosenthal, Scientific Director of The Jackson Laboratory. Our Science Hour Warm Upbelow gives a preview of Dr. Rosenthal’s talk, Exploring COVID-19 Host Genetics with Mice, where she discusses JAX’s new program to develop animal models of COVID-19 through humanizing their genetically diverse mouse strains to reflect different patient responses to the virus.

Dr. Rosenthal joins the Science Hour this Thursday, May 13 at 7:30pm. Haven’t registered yet? Click here to register!

Known as: A Molecular Biologist, and Scientific Director of the Jackson Laboratory

Based out of: Bar Harbor, Maine

What she does in 10 words or less: Studies genetic variation in mice to better understand human disease.

Why what she does is important to you: Dr. Rosenthal uses naturally occurring variation in the genetic code of different strains of mice to study the biology of aging and regenerative medicine. By using mice as models for the differences between individual people, Dr. Rosenthal and her team are able to investigate, for example, how our immune system can be influenced to improve tissue repair, including in the heart. The use of genetic engineering and targeted mutagenesis gives researchers like Nadia the ability to find methods for treatment of degenerative conditions that are usually considered incurable.

What you’ll learn from the talk: How the team at Jackson Laboratory, led by Dr. Rosenthal, is using genetically diverse mice to study susceptibility to SARS-Cov-2 and how mice can help us develop a new understanding of why COVID-19 affects people so differently.
 
Key Terms:

Genetically engineered – the artificial manipulation of genetic material (DNA) to modify an organism.

Degenerative disease – A disease in which the function or structure of the affected tissues or organs changes for the worse over time. For example, osteoporosis, and Alzheimer disease.

Regenerative medicine – Replacing tissue or organs that have been damaged by disease, trauma, or congenital issues with healthy tissue.

Targeted mutagenesis – Deliberate change in the genetic structure directed at a specific site on the chromosome.
 
Fun fact: Nadia is a trained artist, and designs cover art for the scientific journals she edits as well as the books she’s authored.
 
This event is for you if: You’re curious how genomics has played a role in the study of COVID-19, and how mice give scientists an incredible opportunity to research human disease.
 
When: Thursday, May 13th at 7:30pm on Zoom.  Register here.

SPONSORS
 This Science Hour is generously sponsored by:


 

Here’s what’s happening at Action Inc.

TRADES GATEWAY PROGRAMWe’re happy to announce our exciting new Trades Gateway Program! Students will be able to train for the trade of their choice, including plumbing, electrical, welding, HVAC, and more. Visit our website for more details. 


HARBOR VILLAGE MURAL PROJECT Check out this video for updates on Gloucester’s newest public art and sign up to vote on your favorite mural concept.Are you an artist interested in creating a mural? Apply here by May 16th! 


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ACTION INC. FEATURED IN NATIONAL COMMUNITY ACTION REPORT!

Action Inc. has been recognized nationally for our quick response to the pandemic and for successfully fundraising for and launching the Cape Ann Emergency Relief Fund.

(Click on the picture to view)

Cape Ann Museum hosts virtual lecture series on local contemporary artists and their work

Featured artists include: Chris Williams, Ken Hruby, Loren Doucette, Dorothy Kerper Monnelly, and Brad Story

GLOUCESTER, MASS. (May 2021) – To highlight the work of local contemporary sculptors, painters, and artists, the Cape Ann Museum will host a series of monthly virtual lectures through July 8.

“With our virtual lecture series, we wanted to pivot and focus on the living artists who call Cape Ann their home, carrying on this area’s tradition as a destination for painters, sculptors, writers, poets, and all kinds of artists who are inspired by the beauty and history of this special place,” said Museum Director Oliver Barker. “With the virtual format, we can reach a much wider audience, and we welcome everyone to join us.” The lectures are free to members and $10 for non-members.

Here are the details:

Conversations with Contemporary Sculptors with Chris Williams and Ken Hruby

Saturday, May 22 at 1:00 pm

Pre-register on zoom

Free for members, $10 for non-members

Join Cape Ann sculptors Chris Williams and Ken Hruby during this virtual lecture live-streamed from the Cape Ann Museum Courtyard. Chris Williams, who works and lives in Essex, created the Gloucester Sea Serpent specifically for CAM in 2019 to honor Ronda Faloon, who served as executive director for 13 years. In addition, he has created pieces for Logan International Airport, Kendall Square in Cambridge, and Salem State University, among others.

Ken Hruby’s sculpture Uneasy Crown, Uneasy Chair, Uneasy Piece has been at CAM since 2008 when it was installed in memory of past Museum president Harold Bell. His work has been shown in numerous group and solo shows on the east coast and is included in several private and public collections, including the National Vietnam Veterans Art Museum in Chicago. The two Cape Ann artists will discuss their pieces on display, their processes, and their current work.

Pride in the Archives

Wednesday, June 2 at 4:00 pm on Zoom

Free for members of CAM and Historic New England, $10 for non-members

To kick off Pride Month, the Cape Ann Museum presents Pride in the Archives, a participatory discussion on the challenges and rewards of interpreting LGBTQ+ history based on archival materials. This virtual panel discussion will start with the story of Eastern Point residents Piatt Andrew, Henry Davis Sleeper, and their circle — collectively known as “Dabsville” — and continue with a consideration of Andrew and Sleeper’s friendship with neighbors John Hays Hammond, Jr. and Leslie Buswell referencing archival documents from the collections of CAM and Historic New England. Tripp Evans, author of Grant Wood: A Life, will be joined by Martha Van Koevering, Site Manager of the Beauport, the Sleeper-McCann House, and CAM Archivist/Librarian Trenton Carls to discuss how these specific examples provide a window into both the importance and the difficulties of actively collecting, crafting, and sharing LGBTQ+ history.

Contemporary Plein Air with Loren Doucette

Friday, June 11 at 1:00 pm

Pre-register on zoom

Free for members, $10 for non-members

As a peninsula known for its light, waters, and granite, Cape Ann has attracted plein air painters since the form began. In this virtual lecture, Cape Ann Artist Loren Doucette will talk about how contemporary artists like herself both draw inspiration and diverge from this tradition. These painters, while still working from observation, synthesize the information seen on the landscape through poetic expression rather than interpreting it realistically.

Starting with works in the Museum’s collection, including traditional plein air paintings by Aldro Hibbard and more interpretive paintings by Marsden Hartley and Nell Blaine, Doucette will discuss the difference between traditional plein air painting and some of the painters, past and present, that express a more abstracted version of the landscape. This virtual lecture will highlight the stories of artists who, with a freedom deeply rooted in experimentation and innovation, depart from traditional plein air painting to create a vision uniquely their own.

Thursday, June 24 at 1:00 pm

Photographing the Great Marsh

With Dorothy Kerper Monnelly and Doug Stewart

CAM Docent Doug Stewart will sit down with photographer Dorothy Kerper Monnelly to discuss her photographs of the Great Marsh, on display at the Janet & William Ellery James Center from June 28 – July 30. The Great Marsh was the subject of Monnelly’s 2007 book Between Lane and Sea, The Great Marsh which was just republished in 2020. Their conversation will cover the inspiration and process behind her black and white photographs and what they reveal about the everchanging landscape of the marsh. This virtual event will be streamed online via Facebook and Vimeo.

Thursday, July 8 at 2:00 pm

From Boats to Birds, A Sculptors Journey

With Brad Story and Harold Burnham

Join CAM for a conversation between Harold Burnham, a master boat designer, shipwright and sailmaker, and Essex sculptor Brad Story. After graduating from college in 1969, Story returned home to work with his father, Dana Story, in the family shipyard. The Storys had been building boats in Essex since the 1660s and the business was in young Story’s blood.  After 27 years working in the yard, Story gave it up, turning to designing and building three-dimensional works of art that combine his fascination with airplanes, birds and boat building. In this conversation, Story and Burnham will explore the relationship between ships and sculptures and how they’re tied to Cape Ann.

The Cape Ann Museum, founded in 1875, exists to preserve and celebrate the history and culture of the area and to keep it relevant to today’s audiences. Spanning 44,000 square feet, the Museum is one of the major cultural institutions on Boston’s North Shore welcoming more than 25,000 local, national and international visitors each year to its exhibitions and programs. In addition to fine art, the Museum’s collections include decorative art, textiles, artifacts from the maritime and granite industries, three historic homes, a Library & Archives and a sculpture park in the heart of downtown Gloucester. In Summer 2021, the Museum will officially open the 12,000 square foot Janet & William Ellery James Center at the Cape Ann Museum Green. The campus also includes three historic buildings – the White Ellery House (1710), an adjacent Barn (c. 1740), and the recently acquired Babson-Alling House (c.1740), all located on the site at the intersection of Washington and Poplar Streets in Gloucester.   

The Cape Ann Museum is located at 27 Pleasant Street in Gloucester. Due to the ongoing Covid-19 situation, operating hours have been reduced to better protect the safety and well-being of visitors, staff and volunteers. The Museum is currently open Thursday through Sunday, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Timed tickets are required for all visitors at this time and can be reserved online at www.camuseum.eventbrite.com. Admission is $12.00 adults, $10.00 Cape Ann residents, seniors and students. Youth (under 18) and Museum members are free. Cape Ann residents can visit for free on the second Saturday of each month. For more information please call (978)283-0455 x110 or visit www.capeannmuseum.org.  

For a detailed media fact sheet please visit www.capeannmuseum.org/press.

MEDIA CONTACTS:            

Ashley Elias
Teak Media
(213) 400-3402
Ashley@teakmedia.com

Rebecca Robison

Cape Ann Museum

(978) 283-0455 x 124

rebeccarobison@capeannmuseum.org

Free Family Yoga classes offered on CAM Green

Held on Saturdays at 10 a.m., May 8 to 29

GLOUCESTER, MASS. (May 2021) – To continue engagement with children and families, the Cape Ann Museum is offering free family yoga classes every Saturday at 10 a.m. in the month of May. Families will get the opportunity to pose like a sculpture on the lawn of CAM Green with yoga teacher Erin McKay from Treetop Yoga. The four-week series will allow parents and children to do yoga together outside while safely socially distanced.

Yoga attendees will also be given a take home packet of art materials to participate in CAM’s ongoing Community Portrait Project. Started in January 2020, the project seeks to create a collective portrait of the Cape Ann community, before and after the outbreak of COVID-19. All of the collected portraits will be installed in Quilted Together, an exhibition in the Janet & William Ellery James Center at CAM Green from September 24 – November 5, 2021.

The free yoga classes begin on May 8 at 10:00 a.m. and will be held on May 15, May 22, and May 29. Attendance is free, but space is limited so pre-registration is required. Families should bring a beach towel or yoga mat to practice on. To register visit: https://www.capeannmuseum.org/events/free-family-yoga/   

For more information about the Museum, its programs, exhibits, and collections, visit www.capeannmuseum.org.

Redefining Heritage: Garbage to Gardens

Hosted by Essex National Heritage Area, join three Essex County agriculture experts to learn about the history of sustainable growing and the future of healthy soils.

Essex County has a long history of agriculture, with some of the oldest working farms in the country still operating today. There is also a deep-rooted tradition of individual and community gardening that has seen a rise in interest during the social isolation of the current pandemic. Creating healthy soils and sustainable landscapes not only for large, established farms, but for backyard gardeners is essential, and something that the speakers in this session will focus on. Join Jennifer Core, Director of Agriculture for The Trustees, Andrew Brousseau, Partner and Compost Manager for Black Earth Compost, and Lara Lepionka, Founder and Executive Director of Backyard Growers, to learn the history of farming in Essex County, the science of soil, and how those interested in starting their own sustainable garden can begin.

Following the presentation, there will be a moderated Q&A. Live captions are available during this presentation.

Click here to register.

Backyard Growers online workshop: How to Plan Your Vegetable Garden

Wednesday, May 12, 2021
6-7:30pm
📍 Zoom

Join Backyard Growers for this online training to learn how to plan your own vegetable garden according to what you like to eat, the space you have for growing, and the amount of time you have to spend tending to it. In this training, attendees will be introduced to the square-foot gardening method to help them make the most of their garden this year. It includes an interactive Q&A, so come with any and all veggie-growing questions! This is the final occurence of this training for the 2021 growing season.

🙌🏽 FREE to Backyard Growers Program participants (e.g., Community Garden Program and 2020 & 2021 Backyard Garden Program)

👉🏾 $15 General Admission.

Click here to purchase tickets or reserve your spot.

Thank you to our Cultivator and Harvester Sponsors for making this event possible:

GMGI Updates from the Harbor: April 2021

These monthly updates give us the opportunity to report on the wonderful progress being made across GMGI. We are grateful not only to have consistent and positive updates to share, but also for the engaged and supportive community that shares in our excitement. 

This month, you can read about: the stellar Class of 2021 as they continue their internships; the addition of a new team member who will lead the biomanufacturing curriculum in the soon-to-be-completed lab space at the Academy; details on an exciting research collaboration with a neighbor across the harbor; and a sneak peak of some good news to come on sequencing the lobster genome!

Please continue to send us your thoughts, comments and feedback – this communication is valued and appreciated by all of us.

Chris Bolzan
Executive Director

Photo credit: Ocean Alliance

Partnership with GMGI and Ocean Alliance Continues 
 For the past three years, GMGI has been partnering with Ocean Alliance to study whale microbiomes to better understand whale health. 

The microbiome is the collection of microorganisms that reside on or within tissues and bodily fluids. It plays a very important role in health and disease. Like humans and other mammals, whales are susceptible to infections in their lungs. Understanding the prevalence and severity of such infections is key to assessing individual and population health — as well as developing informed management plans. Since we can’t bring a whale to the doctor’s office, one way to assess their health is to collect their exhaled breath condensate (or blow) and to look at their lung microbiome. 

Using Ocean Alliance’s non-invasive SnotBot® drone, we can safely and harmlessly collect a sample of whale blow. Extracting and sequencing the DNA in this sample provides a preview of the microorganisms inhabiting a whale’s respiratory tract, including those associated with a healthy microbiome and potential pathogens. Merging this with other visual markers of whale health, we are developing a means of remotely assessing the health of our most charismatic marine mammals. GMGI is excited to continue to expand this partnership. We look forward to another season of sampling with Ocean Alliance.

Introducing Stephen F. Anderson, the Academy’s Biomanufacturing Lead Teacher


We are thrilled to introduce Stephen F. Anderson, PhD as the newest member of the GMGI team. 

A protein chemist with over 20 years of industry experience and a strong teaching background, Dr. Anderson joins GMGI as Gloucester Biotechnology Academy’s Biomanufacturing Lead Teacher. He holds a B.S. in biochemistry from Michigan State University, and a Ph.D. in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University. Before getting started in Boston-area industry, he did postdoctoral work in mammalian transcription biology at Harvard Medical School. 

After decades of experience running core protein production and analytical labs in both startups and Big Pharma — as well as supporting projects from discovery to manufacturing — Steve is looking forward to getting back to his teaching roots. 

“Since leaving the academic track in 1999, I have missed the opportunities to make a difference in students’ lives,” Steve said. “I’m thrilled to have the chance to get back to it.” He sees a stark, but incredibly valuable, difference in the way Academy operates compared to the traditional college model. “In a university, the students spend years learning things they will never use in an entry-level position; this program gives students the basics and gets them into the workforce ASAP, benefitting them and their community.” 

With the construction of the Academy’s new biomanufacturing learning environment fully underway, the addition of Steve’s skillset comes at an optimal time. The incoming Class of 2022 will be the first cohort to utilize the new space, and they will have Steve’s experience and knowledge to optimize the hands-on curriculum. “I’ve built up a lot of experience in bioprocessing and I feel that the time has come to share it with a new generation,” he said. 

Welcome, Steve!

Steve can be reached at stephen.anderson@gmgi.org or 978.879.4575×112

Class of 2021 Internships

The Class of 2021 is in week eight of their internships – check out a few students in action, putting their newfound skills to use in the lab.

These monthly updates give us the opportunity to report on the wonderful progress being made across GMGI. We are grateful not only to have consistent and positive updates to share, but also for the engaged and supportive community that shares in our excitement. 

This month, you can read about: the stellar Class of 2021 as they continue their internships; the addition of a new team member who will lead the biomanufacturing curriculum in the soon-to-be-completed lab space at the Academy; details on an exciting research collaboration with a neighbor across the harbor; and a sneak peak of some good news to come on sequencing the lobster genome!

Please continue to send us your thoughts, comments and feedback – this communication is valued and appreciated by all of us.

Chris Bolzan
Executive Director
Photo credit: Ocean Alliance

Partnership with GMGI and Ocean Alliance Continues 
 For the past three years, GMGI has been partnering with Ocean Alliance to study whale microbiomes to better understand whale health. 

The microbiome is the collection of microorganisms that reside on or within tissues and bodily fluids. It plays a very important role in health and disease. Like humans and other mammals, whales are susceptible to infections in their lungs. Understanding the prevalence and severity of such infections is key to assessing individual and population health — as well as developing informed management plans. Since we can’t bring a whale to the doctor’s office, one way to assess their health is to collect their exhaled breath condensate (or blow) and to look at their lung microbiome. 

Using Ocean Alliance’s non-invasive SnotBot® drone, we can safely and harmlessly collect a sample of whale blow. Extracting and sequencing the DNA in this sample provides a preview of the microorganisms inhabiting a whale’s respiratory tract, including those associated with a healthy microbiome and potential pathogens. Merging this with other visual markers of whale health, we are developing a means of remotely assessing the health of our most charismatic marine mammals. GMGI is excited to continue to expand this partnership. We look forward to another season of sampling with Ocean Alliance.Introducing Stephen F. Anderson, the Academy’s Biomanufacturing Lead Teacher

We are thrilled to introduce Stephen F. Anderson, PhD as the newest member of the GMGI team. 

A protein chemist with over 20 years of industry experience and a strong teaching background, Dr. Anderson joins GMGI as Gloucester Biotechnology Academy’s Biomanufacturing Lead Teacher. He holds a B.S. in biochemistry from Michigan State University, and a Ph.D. in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University. Before getting started in Boston-area industry, he did postdoctoral work in mammalian transcription biology at Harvard Medical School. 

After decades of experience running core protein production and analytical labs in both startups and Big Pharma — as well as supporting projects from discovery to manufacturing — Steve is looking forward to getting back to his teaching roots. 

“Since leaving the academic track in 1999, I have missed the opportunities to make a difference in students’ lives,” Steve said. “I’m thrilled to have the chance to get back to it.” He sees a stark, but incredibly valuable, difference in the way Academy operates compared to the traditional college model. “In a university, the students spend years learning things they will never use in an entry-level position; this program gives students the basics and gets them into the workforce ASAP, benefitting them and their community.” 

With the construction of the Academy’s new biomanufacturing learning environment fully underway, the addition of Steve’s skillset comes at an optimal time. The incoming Class of 2022 will be the first cohort to utilize the new space, and they will have Steve’s experience and knowledge to optimize the hands-on curriculum. “I’ve built up a lot of experience in bioprocessing and I feel that the time has come to share it with a new generation,” he said. 

Welcome, Steve!

Steve can be reached at stephen.anderson@gmgi.org or 978.879.4575×112Class of 2021 Internships

The Class of 2021 is in week eight of their internships – check out a few students in action, putting their newfound skills to use in the lab.



GMGI Science Hour Talks Continue with Dr. Nadia Rosenthal
Register now! On May 13th, Nadia Rosenthal, PhD delivers our final Science Hour before a short summer hiatus. 

Dr. Rosenthal is the Scientific Director of The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor (ME), whose research focuses on regenerative medicine. She has recently begun a new program to develop animal models of COVID-19 through humanizing JAX’s genetically diverse mouse strains to reflect different patient responses to the virus. Dr. Rosenthal’s talk “Exploring COVID-19 host genetics with mice” is on Thursday, May 13th at 7:30p on Zoom. Click here to register. 

Please visit the Science Hour page on our website to learn more about speakers and watch past talks, and reach out to Ashley Destino at ashley.destino@gmgi.org with any questions.


Photos from the Field

GMGI Researcher Dylan Comb collects samples in Ipswich for an ongoing research project focusing on soft-shell clams. 


Enrolling now: SummerSTEM and Academy Class of 2022
 GMGI is currently enrolling for BOTH of our Education programs — the Biotechnology Certificate Program and our SummerSTEM program. If you are interested in joining our Class of 2022, please visit our website to learn more about how to apply. If you know a middle or high school student who would be interested in participating in our week-long SummerSTEM program, please click here to learn more about this exciting summer opportunity


The GMGI Science Minute

Have you ever wondered what means to ‘sequence a genome’? GMGI Senior Research Associate Jennifer Polinski has been hard at work for the past few years creating the reference genome for the American Lobster, and is here to explain how it’s done.  

Gloucester Education Foundation Celebrates Teacher Appreciation Week with Whoo(pie) Pie Wagon

Gloucester Education Foundation (GEF), along with volunteers from Gloucester Parent Teacher Organizations are showing their appreciation for all teachers and staff members in the Gloucester Public School district with visits to each school by the Whoo(pie) Wagon to deliver individually wrapped whoopie pies, courtesy of GEF.

“Our teachers, administration and staff members have worked incredibly hard this year and we wanted to do something fun and lighthearted to show how much we appreciate them,” said Aria McElhenny, Executive Director of Gloucester Education Foundation. “The whoopie pies are a token of our gratitude for the time, effort and heart that the entire team at Gloucester Public Schools has put into teaching and caring for our kids during this challenging year.”

The Whoo(pie) Wagon along with PTO volunteers and Gloucester Education Foundation board members will be on hand to deliver whoopie pies at the following locations and times:

Monday, May 3-         10:30- 11:30 Gloucester High School, 32 Leslie O Johnson Rd

                                    11:45-12:30 East Gloucester Elementary, 8 Davis Street

                                    12:30-1:00 Veterans Memorial Elementary, 11 Webster Street

                                    1:15 Gloucester Public School Admin Office and Gloucester Preschool, 2 Blackburn Drive

Tuesday, May 4-         11:00-11:45 West Parish Elementary School, 10 Concord Street

                                    12:15-1:00 Plum Cove Elementary, 15 Hickory Street

                                    1:15-2:00 Beeman Memorial Elementary, 138 Cherry Street

                                    2:15 O’Maley Middle School, 32 Cherry Street