Sawyer Free Library to host Nick Sullivan, author of  “The Blue Revolution” on Wednesday, June 15 at 6 pm

The Sawyer Free Library will be presenting an engaging and informative evening with Nick Sullivan -the author of The Blue Revolution on Wednesday, June 15, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.

The New Bedford author will discuss his research and ideas on the “Blue Revolution, the rapid development of aquaculture in recent years. He will offer a new way of thinking about fish, food, and oceans by profiling the people and policies, transforming a challenged seafood industry into one that is fueled by fishermen, locavores, and local seafood supply chains interested in sustainable, traceable, quality seafood. He will share how the practices of 30 years ago that perpetuated an overfishing crisis are rapidly changing and the global challenges to preserving healthy oceans.

Sullivan is a writer and editor who examines the impact of business and technology on international development. He is also a Senior Research Fellow at the Maritime Studies Program and a Senior Fellow at the Council on Emerging Market Enterprises, both in the Fletcher School at Tufts University. The Blue Revolution is his fourth book.

The event will take place on the Main Floor of the Library, located at 2 Dale Avenue in Gloucester. It is free and open to the public. For more information, please visit sawyerfreelibrary.org or 978-325-5555.  

Winslow Homer: American Passage – an evening with curator and author William R. Cross at the Sawyer Free Library

The Gloucester Lyceum and Sawyer Free Library is pleased to welcome curator and local author William R. Cross for a discussion of his book Winslow Homer: American Passages on Thursday, May 26 from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m.  

Cross’ newly published book Winslow Homer: American Passage is a definitive biography of the painter. It studies Homer in the context of how his life as an artist was shaped by the turbulent, dramatic political times he lived through, from the Panic of 1837 to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Filmmaker Ken Burns (The Civil War) comments that curator/author William Cross “has done an admirable job bringing to life this most American of painters. Finally, Winslow Homer’s brilliant work and fascinating life are united in one volume.” 

During this special presentation, Cross will discuss Homer and his art, illustrated with slides of images and photos collected from his research.  

William R. Cross is an independent scholar and a consultant to art and history museums. He served as the curator of Homer at the Beach: A Marine Painter’s Journey, 1869–1880, a nationally renowned 2019 exhibition at the Cape Ann Museum on the formation of Winslow Homer as a marine painter. Bill is a graduate of Yale College, magna cum laude, and received an MBA at Harvard Business School.  He and his wife live on Cape Ann. 

Winslow Homer: American Passage will be available for sale at The Bookstore of Gloucester, located at 61 East Main Street in Gloucester, for those interested in having it autographed at the event. 

This event is free and open to the public at the Sawyer Free Library, located at 2 Dale Avenue in Gloucester. Registration is not required. For more information, visit sawyerfreelibrary.org

Dementia Communication: Using Art and Art History to Connect presentation with Siobhan McDonald 

 On Saturday, May 21 from 2:00 – 4:00pm, the Sawyer Free Library will be concluding its series Of Sound Mind with a presentation by artist, teacher, and author Siobhan McDonald.

Siobhan is passionate about helping seniors with memory loss to connect with loved ones and caregivers through conversation and sharing their personal stories. She will share how providing visual arts workshops to seniors with memory challenges inspired her interactive book designed for entertainment, understanding, comfort, and connection: Hilda’s Story: New Bedford, MA.

Get a nostalgic glimpse into the true-life story of Hilda, the child of immigrant parents, as she grows up during the years following World War II in a historic city on the coast of Massachusetts. Experience the decades through the wonder of invention and love of family.

Hilda’s Story: New Bedford, Massachusetts is meant to be shared, and your interaction with your listener can become as meaningful as the story itself. This Picture Book style hardcover (11″ x 8.5″ / 40 pp.) is a wonderful resource for families and caregivers but can also be offered for someone to enjoy at their own pace.

Caring for a senior who is dealing with dementia or other health issues can be challenging, but also joyful and rewarding. Come learn more about this important topic. The event is free and open to the public. For more information visit SawyerFreeLibrary.org or call 978-325-5550.

SFL’s “Books on Tap” with local author Billy Baker at Minglewood this Thursday night!

The Sawyer Free Library is kicking off a new author series, Books on Tap, a night of books, bites, and brew, with award-winning local writer BILLY BAKER on Thursday, May 12 from 6:00-8:00 pm at Minglewood Harborside in Gloucester.  

This first of many fun and engaging evenings of conversations with local authors, sponsored by the Library, is free and open to the public. Appetizers will be provided for attendees, and drinks and food will be available for purchase.   

Thursday, May 12 from 6-8pm at Minglewood

Boston Globe writer Billy Baker is the author of the hilarious, moving memoir We Need to Hang Out: A Memoir of Making Friends, which the New York Times called: “An entertaining mix of social science, memoir, and humor…” Joining Baker for the event will be his friend Kevin Phoenix, owner of Community Fitness Cape Ann. The two will discuss Billy’s book, what it’s like trying to balance work and family life, and the importance of friendship as we age.  The audience will be encouraged to join in on the spirited conversation.

Billy Baker is a staff writer for The Boston Globe, where he writes narrative features and humorous columns. A native of South Boston, he is a graduate of Boston Latin School, Tulane University, and the Columbia Journalism School. Baker has received the Deborah Howell Award for Writing Excellence from the American Society of News Editors and was a member of the Globe team awarded the Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings. Billy resides on Cape Ann in Essex with his family. 

Sawyer Free Library’s first “Books and Tap” will be held in the event room at Minglewood Harborside, located at 25 Rogers Street in Gloucester. Registration not required. For more information visit sawyerfreelibrary.org or call 978-325-5553.

Reminder: Author Ted Reinstein at the Sawyer Free Library this Saturday, 1/8 from 2-4pm

The Sawyer Free Library will host award-winning author and journalist Ted Reinstein this Saturday, January 8, from 2:00-4:00 pm. He will speak about his latest book, Before Brooklyn: The Unsung Heroes Who Helped Break Baseball’s Color Barrier, on the Main Floor of the Library located at 2 Dale Avenue in Gloucester, MA.

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is not required. Copies of the book Before Brooklyn: The Unsung Heroes Who Helped Break Baseball’s Color Barrier will be available. Face masks are mandatory for those attending. 

Saturday, January 8, 2-4pm at the Sawyer Free Library

In April of 1945, exactly two years before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in major league baseball, liberal Boston City Councilman Izzy Muchnick persuaded the Red Sox to try out three black players in return for a favorable vote to allow the team to play on Sundays. The Red Sox got the councilman’s much-needed vote, but the tryout was a sham; the three players would get no closer to the major leagues. It was a lost battle in a war that was ultimately won by Robinson in 1947. This book tells the story of the little-known heroes who fought segregation in baseball, from communist newspaper reporters to the Pullman car porters who saw to it that black newspapers espousing integration in professional sports reached the homes of blacks throughout the country. It also reminds us that the first black player in professional baseball was not Jackie Robinson but Moses Fleetwood Walker in 1884, and that for a time integrated teams were not that unusual. And then, as segregation throughout the country hardened, the exclusion of blacks in baseball quietly became the norm, and the battle for integration began anew.

Ted Reinstein is an award-winning, longtime reporter for Boston’s celebrated nightly-newsmagazine, “Chronicle.” He is the author of three previous books, including New England Notebook: One Reporter, Six StatesUncommon Stories (Globe Pequot Press), selected by National Geographic Traveler in 2014 as a “Best Pick.” 

For more information about the event or other Sawyer Free Library offerings, visit sawyerfreelibrary.org or call 978-325-5500.

Sawyer Free Library to host “Author Talk with Ted Reinstein” to discuss his new book on Saturday, Jan 8th at 2pm

The Sawyer Free Library will host award-winning author and journalist Ted Reinstein on Saturday, January 8, from 2:00-4:00 pm. He will speak about his book, Before Brooklyn: The Unsung Heroes Who Helped Break Baseball’s Color Barrier, on the Main Floor of the Library located at 2 Dale Avenue in Gloucester, MA.

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is not required. Copies of the book Before Brooklyn: The Unsung Heroes Who Helped Break Baseball’s Color Barrier will be available. Face masks are mandatory for those attending. 

In Before Brooklyn: The Unsung Heroes Who Helped Break Baseball’s Color Barrier, Ted Reinstein tells the story of the little-known heroes who fought segregation in baseball. From communist newspaper reporters to the Pullman car porters who saw that black newspapers espousing integration in professional sports reached the homes of blacks throughout the country. It also reminds us that the first black player in professional baseball was not Jackie Robinson but Moses Fleetwood Walker in 1884 and that for a time-integrated teams were not that unusual. And then, as segregation throughout the country hardened, the exclusion of blacks in baseball quietly became the norm, and the battle for integration began anew.

Before Brooklyn by Ted Reinstein

Reinstein is an award-winning, longtime reporter for Boston’s celebrated nightly-newsmagazine, “Chronicle.” He is the author of three previous books, including New England Notebook: One Reporter, Six StatesUncommon Stories (Globe Pequot Press), selected by National Geographic Traveler in 2014 as a “Best Pick.” Ted is a native of Winthrop, Massachusetts.

For more information about the event or other Sawyer Free Library offerings, visit sawyerfreelibrary.org or call 978-325-5500.

Panel Discussion with All Five 2021 Agatha Award Nominees for Best First Novel on 11/3 at 7pm

Virtual Presentation: This Wednesday, November 3,  7:00 PM – 8:15 PM 

Meet the country’s best new mystery writers in this all-star panel discussion featuring all five nominees for this year’s Agatha Award for Best First Novel — Esme Addison (A Spell For Trouble); Tina deBellegarde (Winter Witness); Mary Keliikoa (Derailed); Erica Ruth Neubauer (Murder At The Mena House); and Laura Jensen Walker (Murder Most Sweet).  Bestselling, award-winning author Catriona McPherson will serve as moderator.

Sponsored by the Friends of the Tewksbury Library. Presented by Sawyer Free Library in collaboration with a number of Massachusetts libraries.

REGISTER HERE

For more information go to SawyerFreeLibrary.org or call 978-325-5500

Virtual Event with 2021 Agatha Award Nominees

Local Author Talk with Patricia Hanlon

Sawyer Free Library is hosting local author PATRICIA HANLON on Wednesday, June 23 from 7-8:30m for a virtual book talk about her recently published book “Swimming to the Top of the Tide.”

REGISTER HERE to receive Zoom Link.

“The Great Marsh is the largest continuous stretch of salt marsh in New England, extending from Cape Ann to New Hampshire. Patricia Hanlon and her husband built their home and raised their children alongside it. But it’s not until the children are grown that they begin to swim the tidal estuary daily. Immersing herself, she experiences, with all her senses in all seasons, the vigor of a place where the two ecosystems of fresh and salt water mix, merge, and create new life. Noting the disruptions caused by human intervention, she bears witness to the vitality of the watersheds, their essential role in the natural world, and the responsibility of those who love them to contribute to their sustainability.” -Bellevue Literary Press