Bach Birthday Concert in the Gloucester Meetinghouse March 21st

Bach 335th Birthday Concert!

Saturday, March 21st, 2020, 7:30pm

The Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation celebrates the music of Johann Sebastian Bach with an orchestral concert on Saturday, March 21st at 7:30pm, the 335th anniversary of the composer’s birth. The Bach Birthday Concert is performed by the Appleton Consort, led by Mark Dupere, and played on period instruments. Highlights of the performance include Bach’s Orchestral Suite No. 3, the Violin Concerto in A minor, and the Harpsichord Concerto No. 5. The evening concludes with a performance of Bach’s ever popular Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F major. The ensemble, as Bach originally scored it, includes two hunting horns, three oboes, bassoon, violin piccolo, strings, and continuo. Don’t miss this spectacular evening of music by the beloved composer in the Gloucester Meetinghouse, one of the region’s finest concert venues. Tickets available in advance online at gloucestermeetinghouse.org and at the door.

Bach statue in front of the Thomaskirche where he was the Cantor in Leipzig

THE APPLETON CONSORT
The Appleton Consort, directed by Mark Dupere, is named for the town of Appleton, Wisconsin, home of Lawrence University, where Dupere is Director of Orchestral Studies. Samuel Appleton, prominent Massachusetts merchant and philanthropist who had lived in Ipswich, was the father-in-law of the founder of Lawrence University. Appleton made a generous gift to the Lawrence University library, and in gratitude, the citizens named the town for him. Generations of the Appleton family made their home in the Boston area and on Cape Ann with many connections to the area’s businesses and institutions. For example, Thomas Appleton who was considered the finest organ builder in New England, built the first pipe organ in the gallery of Gloucester’s Unitarian Universalist Church in the 1820s.

Mark Dupere is Assistant Professor of Music at Lawrence University. His undergraduate study of the cello led to continued work at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague, The Netherlands, where he specialized in baroque cello. It was here that Mark met his wife Emily Dupere who completed her studies in baroque violin. Mark has performed extensively throughout the United States and Europe and is featured on numerous recordings. He was named New Young Artist at the Victoria Bach Festival, performed in the Leipzig Bach Competition, and apprenticed with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment in London. Emily tours frequently as a violinist in the Monteverdi Orchestra with Sir John Eliot Gardiner. As an educator, Mark seeks to share his passion for music-making and active engagement with audiences in the performance of music from all periods.

Members of the Appleton Consort include: Elisabeth Axtell and John Aubrey, horn; David Dickey, Andrew Blanke, and Joyce Alper, oboe; Allen Hamrick, bassoon; Emily Dupere, Asako Takeuchi, and Anna Griffis, violin; Lauren Nelson, viola; Mark Dupere, cello; Motomi Igarashi, bass; and Guy Whatley, harpsichord.

IN GRATITUDE
The Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation is deeply grateful to all our 2019-20 Concert and Event Series Sponsors. We extend a special thank you to H. Woody Brock and Scobie Ward for their generous gifts to underwrite the Bach Birthday Concert. 

LOCATION AND INFORMATION
The Gloucester Meetinghouse is located at the corner of Church and Middle Streets. The accessible side entrance is at 10 Church Street. Weather permitting, event parking is available on the green and at parking lots nearby in the Historic District. Tickets are available in advance online at gloucestermeetinghouse.org and at the door. Preferred seating $45; general $30; students $10 with ID; under 12 free.

Childe Hassam portrait of the Meetinghouse from the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art

FOR OUR FATHERS, an evening of song and art with Ute Gfrerer and Lisa Rosowsky on Sunday April 28th in the Gloucester Meetinghouse

UteGfrerer_hi-resInternationally acclaimed Austrian soprano Ute Gfrerer and renowned Boston artist Lisa Rosowsky, present a deeply moving evening of song and art, based on the legacy of silence of their two fathers during World War II, one an Austrian member of the Nazi Youth Party, and one a French Jew. In a unique collaboration, the two artists present a Holocaust-themed program of music and mixed media artworks, based on memories of their fathers.

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Singer Ute Gfrerer, accompanied on the piano by William Merrill, and artist Lisa Rosowsky present a program based on a chance meeting in 2017, when they learned that they both suffered a legacy of silence and grief from their fathers’ very different experiences in World War II. Gfrerer’s father was a member of the Nazi Youth Party and a soldier, while Rosowsky’s father went into hiding in France after his parents were arrested and sent to Auschwitz. The two daughters have transferred their grief, anger and love for their fathers into an unforgettable evening of art and music.

The program includes Holocaust-based songs with music by Kurt Weill and Norbert Glanzberg among others. The songs are matched with artworks that explore family history and memory. Our own hearts and memories will be stirred by this astonishing combination of music and art.

This event is co-sponsored by Temple Ahavat Achim with support from the Paulson Foundation. It is also supported by the Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation sponsors and the Massachusetts Cultural Council. Proceeds from the event will be used to benefit the ongoing preservation of the Meetinghouse as well as to support Temple Ahavat Achim’s Rabbi Myron and Eileen Geller Endowment Campaign for the Sylvia Cohen Religious School and Family Learning.

The event date is Sunday, April 28th 2019 at 7:30pm in the historic Gloucester Meetinghouse (home of the Unitarian Universalist Church) located on the green at the corner of Church and Middle Streets.  Event parking is allowed on the green and is available at other parking lots nearby in the Historic District.   For those with physical challenges an elevator up to the Sanctuary level is available from the accessible side entrance at 10 Church Street.

TICKETS ONLINE OR AT THE DOOR – cash, check or credit card

Preferred                     $45

General                        $30

Students                      $10 with ID

12 & Under                 Free

(no one turned away for lack of funds, ask at the door)

Advance ticket purchases and more information at www.gloucestermeetinghouse.org

Labor Day Weekend Traffic & Events Notice (9/1 to 9/4)

Gloucester’s Labor Day Weekend Events & Traffic Advisory for Sept 1 to Sept 4, 2017:

Please be advised of special events and beach/marathon traffic this long weekend (especially for Monday’s marathon), including:

Thank you to the Gloucester Police Department (Official)Gloucester Beaches / DPW, and all city staff working this weekend to help support these events and services! Happy Labor Day!

Gloucester Awarded $97,500 State Grant for Pump Stations Floodproofing Redesign Retrofit

Baker-Polito Administration Awards $2.2 Million for Coastal Communities to Prepare for Climate Change 

BOSTON – The Baker-Polito Administration today announced more than $2.2 million in funding to support local efforts to increase community preparedness and resilience to coastal storm and climate change impacts, including storm surges, flooding, erosion, and rising sea levels. These grants, provided by the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs’ Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM), are being awarded to Dennis, Duxbury Beach Reservation, Inc., Eastham, Essex, Falmouth, Gloucester, Kingston, Marshfield, Mattapoisett, New Bedford, Northeastern University, Salem, Scituate, Wareham, Weymouth and Winthrop. Fifty-one resilience projects have been completed under the Baker-Polito Administration with an investment of over $6.8 million for these projects.

“Protecting and preparing Massachusetts’ extensive residential and commercial developments, port facilities, habitats and natural resources from changing climate conditions along our coast is a priority for our administration,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “We are committed to addressing these challenges and pleased to provide more than $2 million to coastal communities to adapt and prepare for future storms.”

“Massachusetts is home to 78 coastal communities with unique economic assets that drive sustainable growth,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito, who also serves as Chair of the Seaport Economic Council. “Today’s grants will help more than a dozen communities from Cape Cod to the North Shore and the South Coast better protect the assets that help drive their local communities.”

The funding continues the commitment of the Baker-Polito Administration to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, safeguard residents, municipalities, and businesses from the impacts of climate change, and build a more resilient Commonwealth. Earlier this year, the Administration awarded over $1 million in grant funding and designation status has been awarded to 71 towns and cities across the Commonwealth to provide communities with technical support, climate change data and planning tools to identify hazards and develop strategies to improve resilience.

“The Commonwealth’s coastal communities are leading by example to proactively integrate climate change projections in planning, infrastructure improvements and the stabilization of natural coastal buffers like salt marsh and barrier beaches,” said Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Matthew Beaton. “Through these grants, we are helping to enable communities to become more resilient to coastal storms and sea level rise over time.”

CZM’s Coastal Resilience Grant Program provides financial and technical support for innovative local efforts to increase awareness and understanding of climate impacts, plan for changing conditions, redesign vulnerable community facilities and infrastructure and implement nonstructural measures to increase natural storm damage protection, flood and erosion control and community resilience. Grants can be used for planning, public outreach and feasibility assessment and analysis of shoreline vulnerability, as well as for design, permitting, construction and monitoring of projects that enhance or create natural resources to provide increased shoreline stabilization and flood control.

“Gloucester joins our local, state, regional and global leaders to make our communities more resilient to the effects of climate change,” said Gloucester Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken. “All of us will suffer the costs if we don’t act, both in our budgets and in our homes which will be lost. While these coastal resilience grants will help communities like Gloucester endure future storm events and minimize public health and environmental risks due to climate change, we cannot solve these issues alone and remain grateful for the support from the Baker-Polito administration in navigating solutions both short term and long.”

“Through the Coastal Resilience Grant Program, CZM actively works with communities and other partners to develop effective strategies to address shoreline erosion, flooding and climate change issues,” said CZM Director Bruce Carlisle. “We recognize the tremendous efforts and commitment at the local level needed to complete these projects, and we look forward to sharing project results with other coastal communities experiencing similar issues.”

Gloucester – $97,500

  • Project: Gloucester Pump Stations – Floodproofing Redesign and Retrofit
  • Description: The City of Gloucester will design and prepare bid specifications for infrastructure improvements at five of its most vulnerable pump stations. The floodproofing measures will be designed to protect the long-term function of the pump stations from anticipated sea level rise impacts.

The Massachusetts Office Coastal Zone Management is the lead policy and planning agency on coastal and ocean issues within the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs. Through planning, technical and grant assistance and public information programs, CZM seeks to balance the impacts of human activity with the protection of coastal and marine resources. The agency’s work includes helping coastal communities address the challenges of storms, sea level rise and other effects of climate change; working with state, regional and federal partners to balance current and new uses of ocean waters while protecting ocean habitats and promoting sustainable economic development; and partnering with communities and other organizations to protect and restore coastal water quality and habitats.

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Internationally Acclaimed Organist Joonho Park plays Bach on April 22nd

The Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation is pleased to present young Korean organ virtuoso Joonho Park performing an all-Bach program in a progressive organ recital. He teaches at the University of Texas at Austin and is the winner of many international organ competitions.  Joonho Park has been hailed as an amazing talent with exquisite technique and exciting musicality.  He will be playing some of the most technically demanding and beloved organ works of Johann Sebastian Bach.

The first half will be performed in the Meetinghouse, home of the Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church, on the distinguished 1893 Hutchings pipe-organ, restored by world-renowned Gloucester organ-builder Charles Fisk in 1962.  George Hutchings built the original Boston Symphony Hall organ in 1903 and his instruments are known for their beautiful tone colors and powerful foundation stops.

At the intermission, the audience will stroll next door for the second half of the concert in St. John’s Episcopal Church on the innovative 1989 C. B. Fisk pipe-organ, the firm’s Opus 97. This is the only new Fisk instrument commissioned on Cape Ann.  Like the earlier Hutchings instrument it has mechanical (tracker) key action for the most responsive touch and it has a rich combination of tonal qualities well-suited to the authentic performance of Bach’s music.

A gala reception will follow the concert at St. John’s.

We are very grateful to H. Woody Brock, Lanesville resident and Bach aficionado for being the sponsor of this event, the debut performance by Joonho Park in New England.

Admission at the door and online: $20 General, $15 Seniors & Students, Under 17 free

https://gloucestermeetinghouse.org

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City of Gloucester Closed Thursday for Snow Emergency

Tomorrow, Thursday, February 9th the City of Gloucester and all public buildings including City Hall and schools will be closed. Effective at 8:00 AM tomorrow, Thursday, February 9th, the city has declared a snow emergency and parking ban on all city streets due to an upcoming severe snow storm.

From 8:00 AM tomorrow, Thursday, February 9th, until 7:00 AM Friday, February 10th all vehicles are banned from parking on city streets.

Residents may park in all municipal and school parking lots.

Please remove all vehicles from municipal and school parking lots before the parking ban expires at 7:00 AM Friday. School parking lots will be the first areas to be ticketed and towed once parking ban has concluded. Violators of this emergency declaration will be at the owner’s expense. Your cooperation during this parking ban is necessary for efficient and safe snow removal efforts.

All residents and businesses are reminded that they are responsible for clearing snow from sidewalks adjacent to their property. Please make every effort to shovel out hydrants at or near your homes, and please check on your elderly and disabled. All city buildings will be closed on Thursday, February 9th with regular hours planned for Friday, February 10th weather permitting.

To repeat, the City of Gloucester will be closed tomorrow, Thursday, February 9th, with a parking ban issued on all city streets as of 8:00 AM tomorrow, Thursday, February 9th, 2017. The ban shall be in effect until 7:00 AM, Friday, February 10th

Updates will be forthcoming as the storm progresses. Please check the City of Gloucester website and social media for further updates atwww.gloucester-ma.gov

Mayor’s 2016 Year End Review & Thank You

Dear Gloucester Residents,

As 2016 winds down, I want to pause to express my gratitude to everyone for all that you have done to help move Gloucester forward.  Many believe that this year was tougher than other years, but I want to reflect on the positive and look ahead with renewed hope as we enter 2017.

To start the year, our administration and the new City Council were sworn in and we committed ourselves to working together on behalf of all Gloucester residents.  We are lucky to have so many dedicated public officials who are willing to roll up their sleeves and work hard on the issues that we face as a community.

I want to thank all City Councilors, city employees, board and commission members, volunteers, organizers, members of the business community and everyone else who has helped to build on the progress that we have made.  No one person can achieve as much as we did and will continue to achieve by working together.  I couldn’t be more proud of everyone’s efforts.

We have put our fiscal house in order by adopting financial policies that will pay benefits for years to come.  For the first time in many years, all City departments lived within their operational budgets allocated by the City Council and we are well on our way to doing that for a second straight year.  This is a critical first step in building a financially healthy City. As a result of our financial policies adopted for free cash and our work with the school department, school committee and MSBA, we are now better positioned to fund capital improvements to our schools like the roof at the high school.

In my short time as Mayor, we have been committed to economic growth in the City.  We will continue to work to expand our commercial industrial base and upgrading our technological services within the City.  At the same time, we worked to repair our coastal seawalls, establish co-working spaces for entrepreneurs, improve visiting areas like Stage Fort Park, continue our cultural heritage in the arts, attend the Seafood Show to promote Gloucester Fresh Seafood including designing the logo which led to a relationship with 99 Restaurants to sell local fish, work alongside Representative Ferrante, Senator Tarr and our federal delegations to secure funds including a new roof at the State Fish Pier, and so much more.

The City welcomed new changes in the Mayor’s Office to help with constituent services, as well as new staff leadership across many City departments, including Harbormaster, Community Development, Tourism, Communications, Police, Human Resources, and, for the first time in a long while, Fisheries Commission Director. I believe our team is stronger than ever as a result of these changes and I am confident that we will continue to provide the best services to all Gloucester residents.

From our seniors to our students, from Ward 1 to Ward 5, for those just moving here to those who have had generations living here, please know that our administration will continue to provide the best results by working with everyone and building toward a strong collective future.  While we respect our culture and heritage for 2017 and well beyond, we must continue to listen to one another and find ways to deepen our contributions, however large or small, to help every citizen.

As I have said many times, my door is always open and I welcome your input and guidance.

I am sure that 2017 will usher in many challenges for us as a community but I know through everyone’s hard work and what we have accomplished in 2016 that we will be successful.  Thank you and I hope you and your family have a happy and healthy New Year!  Let’s keep moving Gloucester forward… together.

Sincerely,

Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken